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Science & Technology Course Descriptions
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Science and Technology

Our Program

The Department of Science and Technology at Hanover High School offers challenging courses appropriate for students with varied interests and abilities. Our curriculum emphasizes skills and knowledge, along with independent and team problem solving through class discussions, laboratory, and fieldwork. Through design and engineering challenges, students develop their creativity and curiosity while exploring real-world problems.  Project-based learning engages students in the process of science.  Students collect data and use evidence-based thinking to model how the world works.

Our curriculum sequence is grounded in a ninth grade Methods in Science course that emphasizes the development of fundamental skills for working with both quantitative and qualitative data. This foundation is followed by a traditional core sequence of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. This sequence is supplemented by a robust offering of electives that offer students the chance to pursue interest in more specialized areas of science and technology. In these Science courses, students develop science literacy, ethics, and environmental citizenship through the study of current issues in science and technology. Technology courses in the Design Lab emphasize practical skills and solving problems with an engineering design process.

Students are advised by their current science or technology teacher or the department coordinator regarding the next appropriate course. The current science teacher, or the coordinator, must approve the student’s registration selection.  A science placement exam may be administered to students entering grade 9 to assist in determining initial placement.  

An Honors level course requires a student who is capable of self motivation and independent learning as well as a desire to learn a large volume of content with more math applications and more emphasis on standardized tests.  

Movement between the levels is possible according to student performance and desire. Prerequisites are defined for most courses indicating past performance levels which should lead to success in the next course in the sequence.

Two science credits, one in physical science and one in biological science, are required for graduation from a New Hampshire high school. Additionally, one credit in a Fine or Practical Art is required for graduation. A Technology course may be used to fulfill part of this required credit. Students should be advised on course selection by a science teacher for science courses and a technology teacher for technology courses.

Students who wish to consider the Advanced Placement option for Physics, Chemistry, Environmental Science, or Biology, please refer to the Advanced Placement Opportunities section of this handbook.

 

Our Course Offerings

Earth Science Courses

Geology: Geologic History of the Upper Valley
Astronomy

Physical Science Courses

*These courses fulfill the one (1) credit in a Physical Science required for graduation.
General Methods in Science
Methods in Science
Honors Methods in Science
Chemistry in the Community I
Chemistry in the Community II
Chemistry
Honors Chemistry
Real World Physics I
Real World Physics II
Physics
Honors Physics
C.A.P.P.S
Science Lab Technician (in a physical science-related class)

Biological Science Courses

*The first three courses in this listing fulfill the one (1) credit in a Biological Science required for graduation.
General Biology
Biology
Honors Biology
Anatomy & Physiology I
Anatomy & Physiology II
Honors Introduction to Biotechnology
Earth Systems and Ecological Design Honors
Science Lab Technician (in a biological science-related class)

Science Elective Course

Ethics and Contemporary Issues

Technology Courses

*These courses may fulfill one-half (1/2) to (1) credit in a Practical Art, as required for graduation.
DIY I Woods and Metal
DIY II Electronics, Coding, and Rapid Prototyping
Engineering Design I
Engineering Design II
DARMA
Independent Design Lab

 

Science Prerequisite Guidelines

For science courses in which there are multiple levels (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Methods in Science), the following prerequisites apply:

  • In order to continue in an honors science class the following year, students must maintain an average of 80% or above and have their current science teacher's recommendation.
  • To continue in a regular level class, students must maintain an average of 70% or above and have their current science teacher's recommendation.
  • To move from a regular level class to an honors science class, or a move from a general level class to a regular level class students should be earning an average of 90% or above and have their current science teacher's recommendation.

 

Course Descriptions

General Methods in Science

Grades: 9
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: None
HW: The homework in this course is generally less than 15 minutes per night.

General Methods presents the material from our Methods in Science course at a slower pace, with more individualized instruction. Students in this course are supported in pace, readiness, and direct instruction in the development of learning skills. General Methods incorporates the use of individual and group laboratory exercises to learn fundamental science skills and concepts that students will use throughout their science coursework at HHS and beyond. Algebra, graphing, & data analysis are used intensely to describe and explain concepts of science. The major units are listed in the Methods description below. 


Methods in Science

Grades: 9
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Algebra 1 or higher.  Students in Algebra 1 need permission of their science and/or math teacher.
HW: The homework expectation is 20 minutes per night.

This course incorporates the use of individual and group laboratory exercises to learn fundamental science skills such as safety, conducting controlled experiments, making observations & inferences, writing summaries of results and conclusions, measuring, graphing, and using mathematics as the language of science.  Algebra is used regularly to describe and explain concepts in science.The major units are: forensic science, metrics & measurement, heat & temperature, gas laws, introduction to Chemistry, and Newtonian physics and energy.  Each unit includes a project or labs that integrate many of the skills and concepts taught throughout the unit.


Methods Honors

Grades: 9
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Enrollment in Honors Geometry or higher.  Students must score high on the science placement test.  By recommendation by the 8th grade science teacher.
HW: An expectation of 30 min per night.

Honors Methods presents the material from our Methods in Science course at a faster pace, with deeper exploration of topics, and more detailed assessments. Honors Methods incorporates the use of individual and group laboratory exercises to learn fundamental science skills and concepts that students will use throughout their science coursework at HHS and beyond. Algebra, graphing, & data analysis are used intensely to describe and explain concepts of science. The major units are listed in the Methods description above.


Geology

Grades: 10-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: A previous high school science course and successful completion of Algebra 1
HW: The homework in Geology is generally 30 minutes during 4 nights per week.


Imagine sitting on the Hanover green surrounded by jagged 15000 foot peaks, or buried under a mile of ice, or under 60 feet of water at the bottom of a lake that extends all the way to Connecticut. These are just a few of the stages in the evolution of our local landscape on the geologic time scale. In this course you will explore the forces that have changed and shaped our local landscape and in the process describe the past 500 million years of history in New England. These forces include the plate tectonic motions that built the mountains, causing earthquakes and volcanoes, as well as the glaciers and rivers that have torn down and reshaped those mountains. We will learn mapping skills including the use of GPS and GIS technology needed to describe and explore this landscape and the forces that shaped it. 


Astronomy

Grades: 10-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: A previous high school science course and successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry
HW: The homework in Astronomy is generally 30 minutes during 4 nights per week.

This course will offer students the opportunity to apply knowledge of the physical sciences to understanding the processes that govern and shape our universe.  It will emphasize the development and use of observation skills, problem solving, and logical reasoning to explain the relationships and patterns found in our universe.  We will examine earth’s place in our solar system, galaxy and universe. The course will explore the techniques that have allowed earthbound observers to infer so much about the distant reaches of our solar system, galaxy and universe.  Topics may include the following:  apparent motions of daytime and nighttime sky objects; the celestial sphere and solar system motions; apparent size and distance to celestial objects; light and its use in determining the nature of stars.


General Biology

Grades: 10-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: None
HW: There is no homework assigned unless work is not completed in class.

This course is a general survey of biology concepts designed to expose students to a wide range of biology topics in practical preparation for life and a range of post secondary options. There is greater student support and a smaller class size, compared to Biology and Honors Biology courses. Major goals are to develop the appreciation and wonder for complexity of the world of living things and to help students develop the ability to solve problems involving basic biological concepts. Students are expected to be able to work both independently and collaboratively. There are many formative opportunities for learning through a unit. At the conclusion of each unit students are asked to apply concepts on summative assessments. The course topics are detailed in the Biology course description. 


Biology

Grades: 10-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Meets prerequisite grade for Methods in Science, General Methods, or permission of Science Coordinator
HW: The homework in Biology is generally 20 minutes per night using the course textbook.

This biology course is designed to provide a solid background for college biology as well as practical preparation for life. A major goal is to develop an appreciation and wonder for the complexity of the world of living things. The course also stresses the ordered interrelationships between living things and the nonliving environment. Concepts covered are Biology Tools and Methods, Cellular Structure and Function, Cellular Energetics, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry of Life, Climate Change, Genetics, Evolution and Ecology. Students are expected to be able to work both independently and collaboratively. There are many formative opportunities for learning through a unit. At the conclusion of each unit students are asked to apply concepts on summative assessments


Biology Honors

Grades: 10-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and meets the prerequisite grade for Methods or Honors Methods and recommendation of the instructor.
HW: There is generally 45 minutes of homework per night during this course.

This course is designed for students who can learn concepts independently and apply them to novel situations.  Students design their own capstone projects for some units.  In other units, the laboratory is the center of this biology course. Students make careful observations, form hypotheses, and test them by making appropriate experiments. The student will be expected to carefully collect and interpret data, and finally form and communicate conclusions in lab reports and group discussions. In this manner, the student is expected to learn the basic concepts of biology and how they relate, as well as incorporate the scientific method into their work.  An attempt is made to show the importance of mathematics as a tool applied to investigating biological concepts as well as stressing the relationship of the physical sciences to the study of life. Throughout, the major concern is to develop an appreciation and wonder for the complexity of the world of living things, yet stress the ordered interrelationships between living things and the nonliving environment. Concepts covered are the same as detailed in Biology with the addition of biotechnology. 


Anatomy and Physiology 1

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: Biology or General Biology with permission of the instructor
HW: The homework in Anatomy and Physiology generally includes watching a video or lecture and/ or reading an article and taking notes and participating in class discussions. The other major component of homework is studying for assessments.  Most students take Anatomy and Physiology as a second science so extensive homework is kept to a minimum.

This is a survey course focusing on the major systems of the human body. Topics include body form fits the function, homeostasis, skeletal, and muscular systems. This is not an honors level course, but an in-depth look at the structure and function of the human body. This course is appropriate for any student interested in pursuing a career in any health-care related field as well as anyone who inhabits a human body! There is little, if any, dissection of preserved specimens during this semester.


Anatomy and Physiology 2

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: Biology or General Biology with permission of the instructor
HW: The homework in Anatomy and Physiology generally includes watching a video or lecture and or reading an article and taking notes and participating in class discussions. The other major component of homework is studying for assessments.  Most students take Anatomy and Physiology as a second science so extensive homework is kept to a minimum.

This is a survey course focusing on the major systems of the human body. Topics include the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and immune systems. This is not an honors level course, but an in-depth look at the structure and function of the human body. This course is appropriate for any student interested in pursuing a career in any health-care related field as well as anyone who inhabits a human body! Taking Anatomy & Physiology I is recommended, but not required. Dissection of preserved specimens is strongly encouraged during the semester, but not required.


Science Lab Technician 

Grades: 10-12
Credit: 1 or 1/2
Prerequisites:

Student Lab Technicians will participate in the designing and testing of course activities, preparing labs and assisting in lab situations.  Lab techs will become proficient with a variety of lab skills, such as those involving the handling of potentially dangerous science materials or the care of living organisms. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the subject matter, laboratory design and the techniques of teaching science.


Introduction to Biotechnology Honors

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology or Honors Biology and  Chemistry, one year of Algebra, and recommendation of the instructor.
HW: An average of 30 min of homework is expected per night

This course provides a solid foundation in laboratory techniques in biotechnology.  Three aspects of genetics are covered: 1) Mechanisms of gene transmission, including chromosome mapping and genetic pathways; 2) Mutational analysis of biological processes with an emphasis on mutations that affect chromosome transmission; 3) An introduction to genomics—the cloning and sequence analysis of whole genomes.  The emphasis is on both the formal genetic mechanisms and molecular techniques. The development of recombinant DNA technologies has resulted in an explosion of new ideas and laboratory techniques in the realm of molecular biology.  This course is very “lab heavy”.


Earth Systems / Ecological Design Honors

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Successful completion of honors biology or biology, and honors chemistry or chemistry, and recommendation from current instructor. Students may use this course in preparation for the advanced placement environmental science exam.
HW: 30 minutes average per night of homework is expected.


With the growing urgency of environmental challenges and need for creative solutions, the successful future of humanity requires ecologically literate citizens. Earth’s Systems and Ecological Design is a rigorous science course that investigates the hydrosphere, geosphere, atmosphere and biosphere, and the processes that connect them. Scientists are increasingly viewing Earth as a dynamic system – a combination of interrelated parts forming a collective whole. This course investigates ecological principles which govern our natural world, and strongly emphasizes biogeochemical relationships.  With a stronger understanding of ecological principles and planetary processes, students will be able to think critically about our current environmental and societal challenges, the systems that create these challenges, and how industrial models can be redesigned to be environmentally sustainable. 
“Environmental Sustainability is the rates of renewable resource harvest, pollution creation, and non-renewable resource depletion that can be continued indefinitely. If they cannot be continued indefinitely then they are not sustainable.” (Herman Daly)
 Looking at nature’s designs to help us solve our environmental challenges (ecomimicry) will also be emphasized and hands-on experiences in ecosystem management will be included. This course provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the relationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental challenges both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these challenges, and to design alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them based on ecological principles.  Student interest in using scientific principles to solve humanity's environmental and societal challenges from the community level to the global level is important as well as a strong academic record. 


Chemistry in the Community 1

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: A previous high school science course and successful completion of Algebra 1.  An interest in environmental topics.
HW: Students are expected to work each day outside of class for 5-10 minutes of homework.

Chemistry and the Community is a course designed to enable students to make informed judgments on environmental issues that are of current concern worldwide while providing a basic understanding of chemical principles and practices. The curriculum is based on an American Chemical Society textbook.  Properties of building materials including metals, atmospheric chemistry, and petroleum use will be emphasized.  Laboratory experience will comprise a significant portion of the course.  Through these topic lenses, typical chemistry concepts will be covered.  Students are expected to work on chemistry each day outside of class. This course is designed for all students to be able to access the concepts involved in chemistry.  The teacher tailors the course to the individual needs of the students with support for mathematical concepts.


Chemistry in the Community 2

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: A previous high school science course and successful completion of Algebra 1.  An interest in environmental topics.
HW: Students are expected to work each day outside of class for 5-10 minutes of homework.
 

An exploration of petroleum use and water chemistry atmospheric chemistry, food chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory experience will comprise a significant portion of the course. Topics such as bonding, energy, and the periodic table will also be emphasized. Students are expected to work on chemistry each day outside of class. The teacher tailors the course to the individual needs of the students with support for mathematical concepts.


Chemistry

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: A previous high school science course and successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry. 

Through lab investigations, class discussions, and demonstrations students will investigate matter and energy, learn core chemical principles, improve scientific literacy, and better understand the finite nature of Earth’s resources. Students will shift their study of matter and energy between the atomic and ecosystem levels throughout the year to gain a holistic view of the scientific discipline of chemistry. At the conclusion of this course students will be equipped to use their chemistry knowledge to better understand our environmental and societal challenges. First semester chemistry topics include matter and change, scientific measurement and quantitative problem solving techniques, nuclear chemistry, atomic structure, and the periodic table. The second semester covers the mathematics of chemistry, chemical nomenclature, states of matter, chemical bonding, aqueous systems, thermochemistry, reaction rates and equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry. It is an expectation to work on chemistry each day outside of class and have a willingness to learn how chemical principles can help solve real-world challenges.
 


Chemistry Honors

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: See science prerequisite guidelines.  Students should be concurrently enrolled in Algebra 2  or a higher-level math class and have the recommendation of the instructor.

Honors chemistry is an introductory course that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills through the experimental approach. Students learn the chemical principles that underpin both the physical environment and biological systems through the study of quantitative chemistry, periodicity, kinetics and other subjects. Throughout this challenging course, students become aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. Further, students enjoy multiple opportunities for scientific study and creative inquiry within a global context. In addition, the course is designed to:

  • Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology
  • Develop an ability to analyze, evaluate and synthesize scientific information
  • Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities
  • Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of science
  • Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
  • Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists
  • Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.

Real World Physics 1

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry at any level.  Successful completion of Methods in Science at any level. 
HW:  Majority of homework will be completed in class with less than 15 minutes of homework per night.
 

This course explores physics conceptually and applies physics concepts to everyday experiences.  Concepts will be explored through hands-on activities, computer simulations, experiments, and projects.  Problem solving through hands-on, geometric, and visual analysis will be emphasized, though basic algebra will also be used.  Topics may include: motion with constant velocity, accelerated motion, forces, Newton’s Laws, and rotation. Culminating unit projects may include predicting the  motion of toy  cars, balancing, and analyzing a mobile, and determining the acceleration of a moving object.  Evaluation will be based on class participation, labs, projects, quizzes, and other practical and written work.


Real World Physics 2

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry at any level.  Successful completion of Methods in Science at any level.  Completion of Real-World Physics 1 is not a requirement for enrollment in Real-World Physics 2
HW: Majority of homework will be completed in class with less than 15 minutes of homework per night.

See the course description for Real World Physics I.  Topics may include: forces, motion, energy, torque, mechanical advantage, light and optics, and electrical circuits.  Culminating unit projects may include building and analyzing a model roller coaster, balancing and analyzing a mobile, wiring and analyzing an electrical circuit, or the construction and analysis of a model catapult.  Evaluation will be based on class participation, labs, projects, quizzes, and other written work.


Physics

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 2.  See Science Prerequisite Guidelines.
HW: An average of 20 minutes per night of homework

This course emphasizes an exploratory and analytical approach to physics. Topics are chosen because of their real world interest and utility to students with various career plans. The primary goal of the course is to enhance the student’s ability to problem solve in a manner characteristic of mathematically based sciences, such as physics.  Major topics are motion, forces, rotation, energy, momentum, sound and light. At the close of the course the student will independently study a topic in physics of their choice.


Physics Honors

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Precalculus or Advanced Math.  See Science Prerequisite Guidelines. 
HW: Homework is assigned periodically and students are expected to spend between 20 minutes and one hour each evening.

The primary goal of Honors Physics is to develop students’ ability to solve complex problems in the mathematically based science of physics. Students choosing Honors Physics should have a high interest in science and strong math skills. The course also requires ability and interest in integrating math with real-world science problems.  This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills required to prepare for a college level physics course for science majors.  This course includes the following topics:  motion, forces, circular motion, gravity, energy, momentum, thermal physics, sound, and light.  During the last quarter of the course students will study a topic in physics of their choice independently.

 


Ethics and Contemporary Issues

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1/2 - Can be either a Social Studies OR Science 1/2 elective credit (semester)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of 9th-10th grade Social Studies and Science required courses.

Ethics and Contemporary Issues is an interdisciplinary elective course, taught by both a Social Studies and a Science Department teacher. What makes a contemporary issue an ethical one? Why should ethics be at the center of our approach to thinking and problem solving? This course allows students to study current issues in depth, from multiple perspectives, while considering the underlying ethical questions that are at the heart of the issue(s).

Students will participate both as active listeners, and active speakers, in class discussions and structured debates. In addition, students will research current issues, examine resources for bias, and prepare materials for use in class as well as for a final project. In the process of reading, discussing, and debating, it is expected that students will be challenged to formulate their own thinking about the issues they are studying.

While the course topics will stay attuned to emerging issues, content that may be studied includes subjects such as:

  • The Human Genome Project
  • Cloning
  • Ethics in business
  • Ethics in medicine
  • Legal ethics
  • Ethics in public policy
  • Ethics in war and conflict
  • Environmental ethics
  • Ethics and globalization

DIY1: Woods and Metal

Grades: 9-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: None
HW: Any assignments Not Completed in Class
 

What do you want to make? In DIY1, students learn to use hand-held and bench power tools to make things that they choose out of wood and metal. If you want a 3D puzzle, you use woodworking tools to make one out of wood or metalworking tools to make one out of metal. The maker projects include: planning, making, and evaluation of process and product. The maker projects are documented in a portfolio that also includes levels of competency for class tools. This course is a prerequisite for other upper level courses. 


DIY2: Electronics and Coding

Grade:  9-12
CR: 1/2
Prerequisite: None
HW: Any assignments Not Completed in Class

What do you want to make? In DIY2, students learn to program digital devices to control electronic circuits that perform a function. If you want to turn on a light at night, you build the circuit, program the digital device and it turns on the light. After completing practice projects to learn the course technologies separately, students will choose a project that includes all the course technologies. The projects include: planning, making, and evaluation of process and products. The projects are documented in a portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for other upper level Design Lab courses. 


Engineering Design I

Grades: 9-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites:  At least one DIY course
HW: Any assignments Not Completed in Class
 

What do you want to make? In Engineering Design I, students learn a variety of engineering techniques and apply them to solve a problem of their choice. In Quarter I students learn and practice the stages of an engineering design process and are introduced to communication skills, hand drawing, the basics of power and hand tools operation, sewing, coding, electronics, CAD and 3D printing. During the Quarter II students work in a group of their choice to solve a problem of their choice.The design project is documented with a portfolio


Engineering Design II

Grades: 9-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: Engineering Design I
HW: Any assignments Not Completed in Class

Do you have a great idea?  Turn it into a reality in Engineering Design II.  In this class students work in a group of their choice to solve a problem of their choice in an environment that stimulates the design work in a start-up company.  Given their competency in Engineering Design I, students direct their project and the instructor takes on the role of project manager and consultant for school resources.  In addition to using class periods to design their solution, student groups also meet periodically with the instructor to provide details on both short and long-term planning and updates on current work.  The course will expand student facility with coding, electronics, operation of power and hand tools, hand-crafting, 3D modeling and printing, and laser cutting.  A second-generation prototype of the first working model is designed. The design project lasts the semester and is documented with a portfolio


Independent Design Lab

Grades: 10-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: Successful completion at least one DIY course and prior instructor approval
HW: Minimal homework expectations include less than 15 minutes per night.

This is an independent studio course designed to give students access to further study in any of the core standards of wood working, metal shaping, electronics, prototyping, coding, engineering, design, or architectural drafting. Students may combine aspects of several areas or may study in depth any one of the curriculum areas. Students will propose an independent study project related to prior Design Lab coursework. The subject can be the student’s choice and must be agreed upon, jointly, in conference with the instructor with whom the student will be working. The student and instructor will develop a contract during this conference and this contract will be the student’s blueprint throughout the project. In all instances the approval of the instructor is mandatory prior to the initiation of the Independent Design Lab course.
 


DARMA

Grades: 11-12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisites: At least one DIY course
HW:  An average of less than 30 minutes of homework per night can be expected

DARMA stands for Design, Applied Research, Modeling, Art. This is a fast-paced semester-long problem-solving course.  Each semester introduces a different design challenge that you will solve collaboratively using a design thinking approach.  You will work hard with both sides of your brain.  This course creates an environment where you and your team members are the drivers for discovery and innovation to solve a real-world problem together.
 


C.A.P.P.S. (Chemistry and Physics Projects for Seniors) (H)

Grades: 12
Credit: 1
Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.  If either Physics or Chemistry has not been taken it must be taken concurrently.  By instructor recommendation.
 

This is an honors course for those who wish to go beyond the introduction to the physical sciences that is obtained in the chemistry and physics courses offered at Hanover High School. The course utilizes a project-based learning environment to develop teamwork, structured programming, technical writing and drawing skills, as well as intuition about physical systems.

We begin the course by learning the potential of the tools available in the Design Lab. Students will design objects using Onshape (CAD software), then bring these objects into the real world in a variety of ways; 3D printing, laser cutting, and machining.  

Next, we enter the world of robotics and coding. Working individually and in teams, students will complete approximately 10 LEGO Mindstorm based assignments of increasing difficulty and scope.  The robotics unit begins with the construction of simple machines and advances full throttle to autonomous robot competitions.

Moving on, students will develop games for social change via MIT’s Scratch programming environment. After choosing a real-world issue, students will conduct research into the issue and develop a game designed to educate the player on the issue. 

The lessons learned from the defined problem-solving phase of the course will be applied to individual research projects in the fields of chemistry and physics.  The entire class will act as a resource for each individual student’s research project. The goal is to expose the student to “real” world collaborative and peer review processes.

No prior engineering or computer programming experience is required – merely an instructor recommendation, a high level of self-motivation and a desire to have fun while learning.

 

  • Course Descriptions
  • Science
  • Technology